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Growing flowers is good for the soul and good for the bees!

It's been a very wet June which, on the plus side, has meant that I haven't had to do much watering of my raised beds but at the same time it has provided optimum conditions for the hordes of voracious slugs and snails that are munching their way through the growing tips of my sweet peas and dahlias. However, as you can see from these photos, all is not lost!

There are a bumper number of flowers to cut at this time of year in my cutting garden. Over the last couple of weeks I've been cutting Cornflowers, Ammi, Candytuft, Sweet williams, Alchemilla mollis, Roses, Oxeye daisies, Nigella, Foxgloves, Linaria, Ranunculus, Sanguisorba, Cirsium rivulare, Salvia, Cephalaria gigantea and Triteleia.

My favourite flower this month has to be that of Cephalaria gigantea (giant scabious). The large pale yellow flowers (featured in this arrangement below) are stunning and I've never seen so many bees on a plant before. I counted 14 bees on just one plant! As it's growing in the border, I only cut sparingly from it so there are plenty of flowers left for the bees.

Growing flowers is good for the soul and good for the bees!

I held another 'Grow Your Own Cut Flowers' workshop this month, this time for 2 students - Mark, a garden designer who would like to incorporate cutting gardens into some of his client's gardens, and Jules, a keen gardener, starting to maintain and create gardens for others. I think we just about managed to get over Jules' fear of cutting flowers from the garden borders by  the end of the session and in Jules' own words:

"I started the working week with renewed enthusiasm and an urge to cut flowers! ... Thank you again for the delicious food, excellent course notes, jam jar posy and bonus cosmos seeds (already planted!)."

Growing Flowers workshop
Jules' jam jar posy

 

 

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