News from the Cutting Garden

Well, the school summer holidays are upon us and so this will be my final post to the website for a while. I will be turning my attention to entertaining my hyperactive 3-year-old daughter Rosie and attempting to lure my 7-year-old Ben away from his computer games.

I've been cutting flowers from the garden practically every day for the last few weeks. My early hardy annuals are producing buckets of blooms. I've been leaving quite a lot of flowers for the insects but ensuring that I always deadhead when the flowers are over to ensure that the plants keep on producing. I've had plenty of flowers so that I can have a display in almost every room of the house and still had some spare to create some lovely little jam jar posies as presents for teachers at the end of term.

Jam jar posies make excellent and indiv
Jam jar posies make excellent and individual presents for teachers at the end of term

Mysterious plant deaths

I've just planted out a second batch of hardy annuals - a few more Cornflowers and some Ammi and Bupleurum to replace those that died off last month in mysterious circumstances. I thought I had the answer last week when I dug up a Cornflower that had been merrily flowering away but had gone yellow and floppy looking. Under the plant, I found what I initially thought to be a Vine Weevil grub, but soon realised was too big. After a lot of searching images of disgusting white grubs on the internet, I think it was actually a Swift Moth Caterpillar. These live in the soil and nibble on plant roots which may explain the Cornflower death. I didn't find any of these caterpillars when digging up other plants that had failed and they seemed to die off earlier so I think either another pest or fungal disease is probably at work there. I'm hoping that everything else will survive and we don't have too many more die-offs.

Annuals from the cutting garden
Sweet peas, Scabious, Cornflowers, Alchemilla, Gypsophila, Cosmos, Lemon balm, Lupins

Annuals

I'm currently picking Cornflowers, Sweet Peas, Lupins, Larkspur, Malope trifida, Gypsophila, Panicum grass, some lovely Nigella (Love in a Mist) and the odd early Cosmos flower.
Annuals that will take over from these as the main crops in a few weeks will be Zinnias, Scabious, Cosmos, Didiscus (Blue Lace Flower), Salvias, Coreopsis, Carnations, and Chrysanthemum 'Polar Star'.

Malope trifida 'Vulcan'
Malope trifida 'Vulcan', Pelargonium 'Lord Bute', Cornflowers, Lupins, Lemon balm

Perennials

Elsewhere in the garden borders, I am harvesting Lavender, Knautia macedonica, Verbena bonariensis, Perennial Scabious, Francoa sonchifolia, Oregano (now flowering), White and Pink Mallow, Sanguisorba, Persicaria, a few Dahlias that have just started blooming in their pots, Pelargonium 'Lord Bute', Galega officinalis and the first Fennel flowers.

Jobs to do

Aside from picking flowers (not really a chore!), I check my raised beds every day or two and spend 5-10 minutes on the following: deadheading, fishing out the odd weed, tying in new growth to supports, squashing aphids and replacing the odd plant that has reached the end of its life or has succumbed to the mystery disease with a seedling from the potting shed. I also try to give the raised beds a really good watering once a week and have fed the Sweet Peas and Dahlias with flower food every few weeks.

Raised Bed
Hardy annuals in my raised cutting bed. Amberboa, Malope, Cornflowers, Lupins, Larkspur and Cornflowers

What's next?

Well, I'll just keep picking my flowers from the raised beds and perennial borders and will look forward to the later flowering plants coming into bloom. I'll clear away spent plants when they cease to flower and put them on the compost heap. I'll keep on top of the jobs listed above - a little time spent every few days will do the trick.

I'll report back on progress after the summer - hope to see you then. In the meantime, I'll still share my cut flower pictures on Facebook and Twitter and have also been working on producing some Cut Flower Guides detailing everything you need to know about growing, cutting and arranging individual flowers such as Sweet Peas and Cornflowers.

Flowers from the cutting garden in July
July cut flowers - Cosmos, Larkspur, Cornflower, Sanguisorba, Galega officinalis, Mallow, Amberboa and Gypsophila
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It's hard to narrow it down to just 10 but these are my favourite annuals to grow for cut flowers. It's important to choose a balance of colours, flower shapes and foliage when deciding which annuals to grow in your patch.

Zinnias, Sunflowers and Scabious
Zinnia 'Giant Dahlia mix', Sunflower 'Vanilla Ice', white Scabious 'Tall Double Mix', Cosmos 'Purity' & Cornflower (that's 5 of my top ten in one vase!)
  1. Ammi majus, Bishop's flower - a delicate, creamy-white umbellifer similar to Cow Parsley with attractive fern-like foliage. It's a great filler to add frothy bulk to an arrangement and to set off other flowers. Flowers from mid-Summer to mid-Autumn.
  2. Cornflowers, Centaurea cyanus - Brings a relaxed, naturalistic feel to a vase. This lovely native flower used to grow in abundance on arable land. The deep blue flowers are easy to grow and can be sown in Autumn for early flowering next Spring. As well as classic blue, I recommend 'Black Ball', a dark, red wine colour. Flowers from early Summer if sown in Spring.
  3. Scabious, Scabiosa atropurpurea - Prolific flowerers from early Summer until the Autumn frosts. The flowers are long-lasting and are a great plant to grow as they also look attractive at the bud stage and at the seed head stage. Let some flowers go to seed to take advantage of this. I grow 'Tall Double Mix' which has a mix of pinks, whites and crimsons but I also like the dark red 'Black Cat' variety and 'Ping Pong' has blue flowers and amazing sculptural seed heads.
  4. Larkspur, Consolida ajacis - Useful tall spires of flowers to add height to your vases. It's similar to a Delphinium but smaller with more delicate foliage and flowers more prolifically.  I'm growing 'Stock flowered mix' this year which has a blend of colours ranging from light pink to dark purple. Flowers in late Spring from an Autumn sowing or early Summer from a Spring sowing.
  5. Love in a Mist, Nigella damascena - A classic cottage-garden flower with lovely fennel-like foliage. It has gorgeous seed pods which can be used later in the season. I grow it scattered throughout my perennial borders where it self-seeds into any gaps. 'Miss Jekyll' is a classic blue, 'Persian Rose' is a delicate pink.

    Zinnia bud
    Zinnia bud
  6. Cosmos, Cosmos bipinnatus - Very easy to grow and produce hundreds of flowers. There are a range of pinks and crimsons to pure white forms. Flowers from mid-Summer to the first frosts. I grow 'Purity' for its simple white flower which adds elegance to a vase and, for something a little different this year, I'm trying 'Click Cranberries' which has more layers of petals with raggedy edges and a deep red colour.
  7. Euphorbia oblongata, Eggleaf spurge - like Ammi, this is invaluable to grow as a filler for your arrangements. Bright, greeny-yellow flowers offset darker flowers beautifully. As with all Euphorbias, the sap is a skin irritant so wear gloves when harvesting.
  8. Zinnias, Zinnia elegans - These natives of Mexico come in a range of rich, bright cheerful colours and will flower from late Summer to mid-Autumn. I've grown 'Giant Dahlia' mix in the past which produces a mix of colourful flowers but this year I'm trying 'Yoga' and 'Art Deco'. The lime-green 'Envy' is a little temperamental to grow and I haven't found that it has flourished as well as some of the other varieties.
  9. Sunflower, Helianthus annuus, H. debilis - Bright, cheerful flowers that are easy to grow and loved by children. Big flower heads look great on their own in a jug but they can be hard to combine with other flowers. I grow Helianthus debilis 'Vanilla Ice' (hard not to sing 'Ice, Ice baby' every time I think of this one!) which produces an abundance of smaller pale yellow flowers that combine beautifully with other blooms. Flower from Mid-Summer to Autumn.
  10. Sweet peas, Lathyrus odoratus. The individual flowers may not last long once cut but these climbing annuals produce so many flowers over a long period and have some of the best scent of any flower. They come in so many colours, you are spoilt for choice. I go for ones that smell as good as they look such as 'Matucana'. Flower from late Spring into Autumn.
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