The festive trimmings have been taken down, the Christmas goodies have been gobbled up, the children are back at school and there is a way to go before spring. I have to confess that I do find January and February gloomy months and there aren't a lot of gardening jobs that need doing. Rather than sink into a pit of doom, I try to keep busy and do find a certain excitement in planning for the year ahead. There are some flowers that can be cut in the depths of winter, my favourite being Hellebores. These are stunning flowers and all the more useful for flowering in January and February. Once you have an established clump, you can cut a few blooms and enjoy their beauty up close.

Hellebores
Hellebores

Use these winter months to plan ahead - browse the numerous seed catalogues, clean your pots and tools in preparation for more busy periods and look back at what worked for you last year and what you can improve upon this year.

By spending a bit of time last autumn potting up spring bulbs, you may even have some pots of small bulbs like Crocus, Iris reticulata and Paperwhite Narcissi to bring into the house to cheer up the winter months. Seeing those little green shoots poking out of the surface is very encouraging on a cold, grey day.

Another way to banish the winter blues is to look back at pictures of your garden from the previous year and remind yourself of things to come. Just starting to peep up from under the soil are bulbs waiting to spring into action, perennials, that are no more than twiggy tufts at this time of year, will flower and bloom again and buds are forming on trees and shrubs, reminding us that they will once again be clothed in foliage and flowers.

Here's a review of just a few of the flowers I have grown in 2017. If you'd like to get the most out of your garden this year and have flowers to cut and bring inside, then please check back here for advice throughout the year or consider a 'Grow Your Own Cut Flowers' workshop to get the most out of your garden.

 

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Time to say goodbye to January. I always find this month to drag on just a little too long. Last year, we did 'Dry January' which made it seem even longer! This year, we've learned our lesson and are going to do a dry February, it's no coincidence that it is the shortest month.. This January we've experienced some proper winter weather in Norfolk, with beautifully crisp, frosty mornings.

Winter frost
Winter frost in our garden

January for me is a time to reflect and plan. I've been poring over flower seed catalogues, making lists and planning what will go where.  This year, I've particularly enjoyed the Chiltern Seeds catalogue which has lovely descriptions and lots of useful advice. If you visit their website, you'll be able to view pictures of each flower variety and search by colour, height and other useful factors. Just be warned that you may be tempted to buy far more seed than you have space for.

Bulbs and early flowers

I always pot up some spring bulbs during the Autumn in the potting shed to bring inside for floral displays throughout the winter. So far I've had Amaryllis, Iris reticulata, Paperwhite Narcissi and miniature daffodils in flower but I'm looking forward (somewhat impatiently I might add) for the Hellebores and Snowdrops in the garden borders to open out into flower. I think Hellebores are my favourite winter flower as they are so elegant. They make great cut flowers although they can be a bit temperamental. If you find yours wilt once cut, they can often be revived by re-cutting the stem and searing the end in boiling water for 20 seconds before placing in cold water up to their necks.

Iris reticulata
Iris reticulata 'Pauline'

Jobs to do this month

Jobs for February will include washing the black plastic pots I  use for seed sowing, ready for the new season. I bring them all in, shove them in the bath, and scrub them with washing up liquid and hot water. Seems simpler than doing it out in the cold with a bucket.

Hellebores and spring flowers
Hellebores and spring flowers

I'll sow sweet pea and Antirrhinum (snapdragons) seeds under cover this month (I place my pots on a sunny windowsill). You can sow sweet peas in November and December too, but I always seem to forget this in the run up to Christmas. Snapdragons need a long period between sowing seed and producing flowers (18 weeks) so, while I leave off sowing the seed of other half-hardy annuals until early April, I make a head-start with these. Follow my tips for seed-sowing here or why not enrol on one of my workshops and learn everything you need to know about growing your own flowers for cutting. Everything from planning, through to sowing, harvesting and arranging flowers.

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It's been a very wet June which, on the plus side, has meant that I haven't had to do much watering of my raised beds but at the same time it has provided optimum conditions for the hordes of voracious slugs and snails that are munching their way through the growing tips of my sweet peas and dahlias. However, as you can see from these photos, all is not lost!

There are a bumper number of flowers to cut at this time of year in my cutting garden. Over the last couple of weeks I've been cutting Cornflowers, Ammi, Candytuft, Sweet williams, Alchemilla mollis, Roses, Oxeye daisies, Nigella, Foxgloves, Linaria, Ranunculus, Sanguisorba, Cirsium rivulare, Salvia, Cephalaria gigantea and Triteleia.

My favourite flower this month has to be that of Cephalaria gigantea (giant scabious). The large pale yellow flowers (featured in this arrangement below) are stunning and I've never seen so many bees on a plant before. I counted 14 bees on just one plant! As it's growing in the border, I only cut sparingly from it so there are plenty of flowers left for the bees.

Growing flowers is good for the soul and good for the bees!

I held another 'Grow Your Own Cut Flowers' workshop this month, this time for 2 students - Mark, a garden designer who would like to incorporate cutting gardens into some of his client's gardens, and Jules, a keen gardener, starting to maintain and create gardens for others. I think we just about managed to get over Jules' fear of cutting flowers from the garden borders by  the end of the session and in Jules' own words:

"I started the working week with renewed enthusiasm and an urge to cut flowers! ... Thank you again for the delicious food, excellent course notes, jam jar posy and bonus cosmos seeds (already planted!)."

Growing Flowers workshop
Jules' jam jar posy

 

 

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