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Rain, lots of rain. Good for the garden, if not the spirits. March heralds the official start of spring and it's also the month to start sowing seeds. A rewarding task, especially if you can do it inside in the dry. I have a small potting shed for the actual seed sowing but I move the pots inside onto my sunny windowsills so that they get the heat required for germination. So far I've sown sweetpeas, calendula 'Orange Flash', larkspur and a mix of colours of cornflowers. I'll sow more hardy annuals over the next few weeks.

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The cutting beds are full of emerging bulbs and I've been cutting some spring flowers to make tiny spring posies. Grape hyacinths make wonderful cut flowers-  having a surprisingly long stem and a delicate scent. I grow the bog -standard blue form and also dark blue Muscari latifolium which has just 2 sheaf-like leaves rather than the sprawling leaves of the common form. Another well-behaved grape hyacinth is 'Siberian Tiger', a white form which isn't as invasive. Baby's breath is a gorgeous pale, powder-blue variety (pictured above).

Other flowers for picking this month include daffodils, primroses, scillas, species tulips and pulmonaria. Pulmonaria is a great spring flower to tuck under a hedge or in a shady spot. Its blue and pink flowers work well in a tiny spring posy.

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Spring posy of grape hyacinths, primroses, tulip turkestanica, scillas, wall cress and pumonaria (just out of shot)

My dark purple trailing pansy has been flowering ever since October when I bought it from Beth Chatto's garden nursery in Essex. Pansies aren't everyone's cup of tea but they do make great winter flowers and I think they look lovely displayed in a terracotta pot.

We have a table in our courtyard which can be seen through the pation doors. It's an ideal spot for displaying pots of seasonal flowers and I aslo keep some pots of herbs on it (mint, tarragon and purple sage).  At the moment, we have pots of grape hyacinths, crocuses, a hellebore and a primula. Anything that is in flower at the right time can be displayed in a pot and then either planted out into the cutting garden or moved out of sight once it's past its best, ready for another year.

Pots of winter flowers
Pots of flowers on our courtyard table.

I hosted my first 'Grow Your Own Cut Flowers' workshop of 2019 and we had a dry, if very cold day, on which to pick our flowers from the garden. We picked and displayed white and dark red hellebores, Viburnum tinus for its white flowers and glossy green foliage, a few stems of flowering currant, some trailing stems of Trachelospermum jasminoides, rosemary in flower and some annual stocks which had survived all winter in the cutting garden.

March flowers
March flowers from workshop

My student, Patsy wasn't keen on the idea of growing tulips as you have to put up with their rather unattractive foliage after flowering but I think I sold her on the idea of edging her cutting beds with the species tulip Tulipa turkestanica. This variety has small, twisted leaves (which don't take up a lot of space) and beautiful pale yellow star-shaped flowers. If you leave some flower heads on, they form beautiful seed pods which are decorative in their own right.

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With record temperatures for February, we are making the most of the sunny days here in Norfolk. Spring really does seem to have come early with blossom appearing on our apricot tree and pulmonarias, grape hyacinths, daffodils and primroses all blooming early alongside the more traditional February fare of snowdrops, crocus and hellebores.

Snowdrops
Snowdrops

I do have to keep reminding myself that the 'Beast from the East' struck in early March last year and we had so much snow that the shops ran out of milk and bread. There is a chance of the wintery weather returning so it's important not to go too mad and plant out anything frost-tender until later in the year.

Winter flowers
Helleoores, Crocus and Snowdrops

In the meantime, I will enjoy the early flowers, picking a few to bring inside for tiny spring posies and I'll finalise my plans for the annuals that I will grow this year.

I plan to sow some sweet peas under cover this weekend and will start sowing some hardy annuals in a week or two, once March is underway. There are some annuals that I always grow  - cornflowers, marigolds, sweet peas and scabious, but I might not choose the same colours or varieties to grow each year. In this way, each year is different and there will be something new and exciting to place in the vase.

Hardy annuals
Hardy annuals with feverfew and borage in early summer
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January is a time of reflection but and when I think back to the previous growing season, I have to admit, I was feeling a bit underwhelmed. I had memories of scorched sweet pea seedlings due to an overly hot, late spring and then a second batch of sweet peas that just didn't take off as the summer was a scorcher and dry to boot. The dahlias were very slow to flower and suffered in the heat, only really flowering well once we were into mid-September. The cornflowers and Ammi majus were short and lack-lustre, sulking in the record-breaking temperatures.

So, it was with trepidation that I looked back through my photos taken of the garden and vases of flowers cut from it. I didn't have to worry - all through the year there were an abundance of flowers to cut (there are at least 2 photos for each month of the year). Ok, so all the tulips flowered during the same 2-3 weeks of the late spring but flower they did. Despite the lack of stalwart favourites sweetpeas and cornflowers, there were plenty of other flowers to be picked. The Cosmos being a prime example of a flower that didn't mind the heat and drought.

I have already bought most of my flower seed for the coming year, although I am sure I will be tempted into making an impulse buy after flicking through all the flower seed catalogues that have been dropping on the doormat lately.

I have decided not to grow Zinnias this year as I have found, that however I grow them (in pots or direct-sown) they simply don't produce enough flowers from each plant for the space that they take up in my cutting garden. In their place, I plan to grow extra strawflowers (Helichrysum) and a wider variety of colours of larkspur which keep their colour so well when pressed.

This year, we have a newly acquired allotment and although I have promised my husband that I won't fill it with flowers, there is surely some space for some tulips and a row of dahlias in amongst the vegetables??

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