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It's hard to narrow it down to just 10 but these are my favourite annuals to grow for cut flowers. It's important to choose a balance of colours, flower shapes and foliage when deciding which annuals to grow in your patch.

Zinnias, Sunflowers and Scabious
Zinnia 'Giant Dahlia mix', Sunflower 'Vanilla Ice', white Scabious 'Tall Double Mix', Cosmos 'Purity' & Cornflower (that's 5 of my top ten in one vase!)
  1. Ammi majus, Bishop's flower - a delicate, creamy-white umbellifer similar to Cow Parsley with attractive fern-like foliage. It's a great filler to add frothy bulk to an arrangement and to set off other flowers. Flowers from mid-Summer to mid-Autumn.
  2. Cornflowers, Centaurea cyanus - Brings a relaxed, naturalistic feel to a vase. This lovely native flower used to grow in abundance on arable land. The deep blue flowers are easy to grow and can be sown in Autumn for early flowering next Spring. As well as classic blue, I recommend 'Black Ball', a dark, red wine colour. Flowers from early Summer if sown in Spring.
  3. Scabious, Scabiosa atropurpurea - Prolific flowerers from early Summer until the Autumn frosts. The flowers are long-lasting and are a great plant to grow as they also look attractive at the bud stage and at the seed head stage. Let some flowers go to seed to take advantage of this. I grow 'Tall Double Mix' which has a mix of pinks, whites and crimsons but I also like the dark red 'Black Cat' variety and 'Ping Pong' has blue flowers and amazing sculptural seed heads.
  4. Larkspur, Consolida ajacis - Useful tall spires of flowers to add height to your vases. It's similar to a Delphinium but smaller with more delicate foliage and flowers more prolifically.  I'm growing 'Stock flowered mix' this year which has a blend of colours ranging from light pink to dark purple. Flowers in late Spring from an Autumn sowing or early Summer from a Spring sowing.
  5. Love in a Mist, Nigella damascena - A classic cottage-garden flower with lovely fennel-like foliage. It has gorgeous seed pods which can be used later in the season. I grow it scattered throughout my perennial borders where it self-seeds into any gaps. 'Miss Jekyll' is a classic blue, 'Persian Rose' is a delicate pink.

    Zinnia bud
    Zinnia bud
  6. Cosmos, Cosmos bipinnatus - Very easy to grow and produce hundreds of flowers. There are a range of pinks and crimsons to pure white forms. Flowers from mid-Summer to the first frosts. I grow 'Purity' for its simple white flower which adds elegance to a vase and, for something a little different this year, I'm trying 'Click Cranberries' which has more layers of petals with raggedy edges and a deep red colour.
  7. Euphorbia oblongata, Eggleaf spurge - like Ammi, this is invaluable to grow as a filler for your arrangements. Bright, greeny-yellow flowers offset darker flowers beautifully. As with all Euphorbias, the sap is a skin irritant so wear gloves when harvesting.
  8. Zinnias, Zinnia elegans - These natives of Mexico come in a range of rich, bright cheerful colours and will flower from late Summer to mid-Autumn. I've grown 'Giant Dahlia' mix in the past which produces a mix of colourful flowers but this year I'm trying 'Yoga' and 'Art Deco'. The lime-green 'Envy' is a little temperamental to grow and I haven't found that it has flourished as well as some of the other varieties.
  9. Sunflower, Helianthus annuus, H. debilis - Bright, cheerful flowers that are easy to grow and loved by children. Big flower heads look great on their own in a jug but they can be hard to combine with other flowers. I grow Helianthus debilis 'Vanilla Ice' (hard not to sing 'Ice, Ice baby' every time I think of this one!) which produces an abundance of smaller pale yellow flowers that combine beautifully with other blooms. Flower from Mid-Summer to Autumn.
  10. Sweet peas, Lathyrus odoratus. The individual flowers may not last long once cut but these climbing annuals produce so many flowers over a long period and have some of the best scent of any flower. They come in so many colours, you are spoilt for choice. I go for ones that smell as good as they look such as 'Matucana'. Flower from late Spring into Autumn.
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A taster of which plants you could be cutting this month from your garden. It is possible to design your beds and borders to include a plethora of flowers for cutting without affecting the display in the garden. All the plants make great garden plants in their own right. Just a few flowers of each type make a lovely arrangement and many of the plants are also brilliant for wildlife.

Mixed border in early May
Mixed border in early May

Tulips
I have Tulips scattered throughout my garden beds but just pick a few stems here and there (in addition to a dedicated raised bed which I treat as a crop). Plant double what you need in the border and you will have extra flowers to cut for indoors as well as a great display in your beds.
If you choose a mix of early, mid and late flowering forms, you can harvest flowers from March to May. Tulips flower best in their first year but you can select varieties that are better at repeat-flowering than others. I've grown Purissima, a white form which flowers in mid-Spring which is just starting to go over, Queen of Night (very dark purple) which started to flower towards the end of April and is looking great in May, 'Negrita' a lighter purple looking good in early April and Black parrot with it's dark colour and lovely frilly edge flowering in late Spring which is still looking good. All of these are supposed to be good repeat flowerers, although as this is their first year, I will have to report back next Spring.

Tulipa 'Queen of Night'
Tulipa 'Queen of Night'

Alliums
We planted over a hundred Allium bulbs the Autumn before last and it has really transformed our beds in May and June before most of the perennials come into flower and after most of the Tulips have done their thing . As there are so many, I can pick a few at a time for cutting without much impact on the garden. I have a mix of A. 'Purple Sensation' with its large, rounded purple pom-pom head, A. 'Cristophii' which has large, fire-work heads of star-shaped, purple flowers, A. Nigrum - a lovely white form and lots of the smaller, round-headed A. sphaerocephalon which flower later in July.

Forget me nots
These started flowering in early April but are still popping up and looking good, especially on the shady side of the garden when flowers appear slightly later. They are wonderful flowers for mixed Spring posies.

Aquilegias
Lovely Spring flowers which come in range of colours and forms. I have a mix of dark purples and pinks dug up from my mother-in-law's garden. They self-seed and you will find lots of little seedlings throughout the garden which are easy to either weed out or transplant to where you'd like them.

Euphorbia
A great foliage plant and a lovely zingy, acid green which looks good with dark Tulips and with colourful Spring flowers. There are many different forms of Euphorbia, both annual and perennial. I grow Euphorbia amygdaloides v. robbiae which is an evergreen perennial. It looks great in my border year-round and is invaluable as it thrives in partial and full shade.

Bluebells
A classic native British flower which thrives in shade. I inherited a small clump growing around the base of a Silver birch in my garden. A few flower spikes cut just as the bottom flowers are emerging adds a lovely dimension to a Spring flower display. You should never cut Bluebells growing in the wild but do go and visit a bluebell wood in May for a spectacular display. If you do add Bluebells to your garden, ensure you plant our native Bluebell rather than the Spanishone as our native species is under threat.

Viburnum lantana (Wayfaring tree) and Viburnum opulus (Guelder Rose)
These both flower this month and are useful shrubs with wonderful creamy-white flowers. I have both growing as part of a mixed native hedge.  A hedge is a great source of both foliage and flowers for arrangements if you don't have much room to grow shrubs in your beds. Both species will produce red berries in Autumn which are useful for adding colour to Christmas wreaths or Winter vases.

Guelder Rose
Viburnum oplus (Guelder Rose) with its gorgeous flat clusters of flowers.


Erysimum 'Bowle's Mauve'

We have this perennial wallflower in a raised bed near the house and it flowers off and on all year round with perfumed mid-purple flower spikes which swarm with bees and butterflies in the Summer. They are one of the very best nectar supplies for insects as they have such a long flowering period so everyone should grow one for the bees and snip a few flowers for yourself too. Just 3-5 stems in a vase will add a pop of vivid colour.

Erysimum and Alliums
Perennial Wallflower and Alliums

Lemon balm
This is a wonderful perennial herb. It smells divine, makes a yummy herbal tea and it has lovely fresh green foliage in May. The new growth is a bit soft and sappy at this time of year but if you sear the stems it will last quite nicely.

May garden flowers
Euphorbia, V. opulus, Hesperis, Alliums & Irises

Sweet rocket (Hesperis matronalis)
A biennial which, if you sow seed in late Summer and plant out in September, will be flowering now. Comes in purple or white forms and flowers profusely. It will self-seed which is great if you want a lot of it, otherwise, keep cutting the flowers and it won't ever get to the seed stage.

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Tulips and Hellebores
Tulips, Hellebores, Euphorbia and Forget me nots

Follow my simple tips to make your jugs of flowers last for as long as possible.

  1. If possible, especially in the height of Summer, cut your flowers either early in the morning or in the early evening when the sun isn't at full strength and the rate of transpiration (water loss through the leaves) is at its lowest.
  2. Use proper flower snips or secateurs so that you don't damage the stems which will interfere with water uptake. Cutting stems at an angle will increase the available surface area for water uptake.
  3. For most flowers, pick before the flower is fully open when the petals are just emerging from the bud. Exceptions are Dahlias, Zinnias and Roses which may not develop fully from a tight bud.
  4. Carry a bucket 1/3rd full of water to your cutting patch and plunge your cut blooms in straight away to prevent water loss and wilting.
  5. Ensure your chosen container is clean before use as a build up of bacteria will shorten the life of your flowers. Hot, soapy water is fine and I use a bottle brush to get into any hard to reach places.

    Cut flowers
    Cut flowers before arranging
  6. Some flowers need Conditioning to maximise vase life. Most benefit from spending a few hours (or overnight) in a cool place, out of direct sunlight, bathing in water up to the first flower bud. Searing the stems of soft and sappy plants such as Euphorbias, Hellebores and Poppies in boiling water will help prevent the dreaded flopping - place the bottom inch of stem in a jar of boiling water for approx 20 seconds while protecting the flower from the steam.
  7. Remove any foliage from the stem which will sit below the water line as it will decay and promote the growth of bacteria. Commercial flower food or your own mix (a tsp of sugar and a few drops of bleach or vinegar) can be added to the water to discourage bacterial growth and provide nutrients.
  8. Change or top up the water in vases regularly and if necessary, re-cut the flower stems of any flowers that have wilted as this might be enough to perk them up again. If you don't want the fuss of having to rearrange your flowers all over again, carefully push the flowers to one side and hold the vase under a gently running tap until all the old water overflows and has been replaced with new water.
  9. Keep jugs of flowers out of direct sunlight and away from heat sources such as radiators as high temperatures dramatically shorten the life of cut flowers.
  10. Some flowers and foliage are naturally long-lasting once cut such as Larkspur whereas others like Sweet peas and Cornflowers have a shorter life-span. You can edit your arrangement throughout the week - remove stems of flowers that have gone over, or snip them off if it is hard to extract them, and replace with some newly cut flowers. If your foliage is long-lasting then you can always re-cut the stems and use it in a totally new arrangement.

The important thing is to have fun and if you feel like picking some flowers in the middle of the day and just plunging them into a milk bottle then don't worry - your flowers may last  a day or 2 less but as you are growing your own displays for a lot less than it would cost you in a supermarket, you won't mind. It's a good excuse to pick some more!

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